Tag Archives: sales tips

Are You “in Sales” or Are You a Salesperson?

I have heard the reply I’m “in sales” so many times when someone is queried about their vocation. There are positions in the sales organization are not directly sales related. CRM administrators, sales operations managers, and support people all play a role in contributing to the bottom line. What confuses me is when a quota carrying member of the team can’t simply say “I’m a salesperson.” It is as if some people want to separate themselves our profession.

Here is a wake-up call for those of you “in sales”. If you don’t get it in your head that you are a salesperson, you will not be “in sales” much longer. Being a salesperson is a mindset. A mindset you never get to turn off. An excellent seller is always looking for leads and making connections. The vast majority of what a salesperson does in their waking hours is directly tied to the bottom line. A great salesperson is circling the name of companies as they read the newspaper and jotting them down on post-its as they watch the news.

A salesperson has a profession and a career. We read books, blogs and attend webinars to hone our craft. People “in sales” have jobs, they will be quick to tell you this. “I have a job in sales” is a typical statement these people will make. These people are also most likely to also hate what they are doing.

The bottom-line is salespeople are typically the highest paid people in any organization. This goes in all industries and geographic areas. What you are taxed with now is deciding if you want a job “in sales” or one of the most lucrative positions in any industry.

Everybody Sells

I have worked for some inspirational and influential people in my sales career. I have retained the knowledge they have passed onto me and apply it on a daily basis. One of the best tidbits that were passed on to me is –EVERYBODY SELLS. Everyone in your organization should understand that your team as a whole is responsible for driving revenue.

The boss and mentor that drove this point home to me gave me this concept in the form of a story. While vacationing on the west coast in the 80’s my boss had met a retired bank executive. What made this retired executive unique is he was barley in his 40s.

When being drilled for information on how he had amassed a fortune large enough to retire at such a young age he responded: “I make sure everybody sells.” Now this is not a foreign concept when applying it to your sales team; this guy applied it to his entire staff.

Every employee in all of his banks was selling. The tellers would ask you if you had seen their latest Money Market rates. Even the security guard by the door would direct your eye towards the rack of brochures by the door. The security guard would do this while asking if you were interested in a mortgage or a new car loan.

This is a relatively simple concept, and my old boss and mentor did successfully apply it to our company. He is now retired, go figure. If everyone in the company shares in the revenue, everyone on should contribute to the generation of revenue. This is even more important for your client facing employees.

Are your customer services and tech support people trained to identify upgrade opportunities? Do your developers spend their time fixing bugs or creating new features they feel will drive revenue? How much does your receptionist know about your product line and offerings? She is the first person every visitor to your company sees.

The formula is simple. More people in your organization selling equals more revenue being generated.

Sales Tips for Successful Trade Shows

In a lot of cases, companies will send junior sales people to trade shows. Over the years, I have seen these babes in the woods make many rookie mistakes. While it is essential for new sales people to get live prospect exposure, it is also important for them to have superb mentoring. Make sure your trade show booth is staffed with the right mixture of your top sales people and your hottest newcomers. Tradeshows are not cheap and squeezing an ROI out of a show seems to be getting harder year after year. This makes it that much more important to seize every opportunity that is presented to you on the road. Here are some rookie mistakes I have seen time and again on the floors of a tradeshow.

Get out of the booth: Nothing irritates me more than seeing 2 or 3 people sitting in a booth all staring down at their phone screens. If your booth seems to have energy more people will be drawn to it. He is a simple trick. Stand on the outside of your booth and cause a log jam. It is easier to engage people when a table does not separate you. If you have 2 or 3 sales people talking to prospects in front of the booth, it will slow down traffic in front of your booth and a crowd will form. This will build excitement and curiosity about your product.

The cocktail hour is for attendees, not exhibitors: I remember a Direct Marketing Association show a few years back where the entire booth staff for one company was totally intoxicated. They were slurring their speech, unsteady on their feet and rude to prospects. They thought in their drunken stupor they were the cool kids. Everyone around them viewed them as donkeys. Making things more interesting the woman in the booth next to them called their company and asked for HR.

During your downtime sell the other attendees: When the show goes quiet during informational sessions this is your chance to strike. Not only is this an excellent time to get competitive information but a superb time to sell and network. When I was selling marketing products, one of the most successful shows in the company’s history was one where we closed ten exhibitor sales during the show.

I am not saying the three above practices will guarantee you show success, but they are a great place to start.

Wash, rinse, reevaluate, and repeat.

I know a lot of great sales people that are fantastic at building strategic account plans. These leaders in their chosen profession create and map plans of attack detailed in every aspect of the sales process from the initial call to the close. What many salespeople fail to do is analyze the deal once it is complete.

By analyzing our wins we can refine and tune our entire process. This is not only good for the sales person but also beneficial to the customer.

Our prospect’s time is just as valuable as ours. By eliminating unnecessary steps in the sales process, we deliver mission critical solutions to customers sooner, hopefully, before our competitors do. In streamlining our strategic account plans, we can also expect shorter sales cycles and more wins. Remember, time kills all sales.

My advice for the day is looking at your top 3 wins and dissect the process that helped you win the accounts. Once you have a clear understanding of how you won the deals… wash, rinse, reevaluate, and repeat.