Tag Archives: sales management

What You Enter In CRM Directly Reflects on Your Ability to Do Your Job

When entering notes and history into CRM systems, I am an advocate of what I call the “bus” theory. If the salesperson working the account was hit by a bus on the way to work the next person to work the account should have all of the information necessary to close the deal.

Information that I feel is crucial is:

  • Does the contact have budget approval?
  • Who are the other stakeholders in the process?
  • Is the sale tied to a project if so what is the go live date?
  • What do the company financials look like?
  • What competitors are in the bidding process?
  • What are the next steps – a meeting or scheduled call?
  • What are the prospect’s concerns and objections?

Other helpful information could be:

  • The gatekeeper’s name.
  • Facts that were discovered during bonding and rapport – hobbies or interests.
  • Links to the prospect’s LinkedIN profile or Twitter account.

What I often find in CRM systems is information that is not only unhelpful but disruptive. Personal attacks of the prospect are not only damaging to the sales process but also your reputation. Entering comments akin to “the prospect is a jerk”, “this guy is a moron” or even worse entering swear words into your CRM is counterproductive.

When entering notes, you should imagine you are talking to your boss or coworkers. In essence, this is what you are doing. If you feel the prospect is a jerk, explain how the prospect is making the sales process difficult. This will not only help you better understand what is making the sales process so challenging but could also help the next person working the account.

When entering the counterproductive information you give your coworkers and superiors the perception you are inarticulate and frustrated in your position. You also give the appearance that you do not understand the customer’s obstacles and objections. The next time you are entering notes in the CRM system imagine the CEO of your company asked you for an update on the account. Ultimately, this is what you could be doing; the CEO might be the next person to look at that CRM record.

Are You “in Sales” or Are You a Salesperson?

I have heard the reply I’m “in sales” so many times when someone is queried about their vocation. There are positions in the sales organization are not directly sales related. CRM administrators, sales operations managers, and support people all play a role in contributing to the bottom line. What confuses me is when a quota carrying member of the team can’t simply say “I’m a salesperson.” It is as if some people want to separate themselves our profession.

Here is a wake-up call for those of you “in sales”. If you don’t get it in your head that you are a salesperson, you will not be “in sales” much longer. Being a salesperson is a mindset. A mindset you never get to turn off. An excellent seller is always looking for leads and making connections. The vast majority of what a salesperson does in their waking hours is directly tied to the bottom line. A great salesperson is circling the name of companies as they read the newspaper and jotting them down on post-its as they watch the news.

A salesperson has a profession and a career. We read books, blogs and attend webinars to hone our craft. People “in sales” have jobs, they will be quick to tell you this. “I have a job in sales” is a typical statement these people will make. These people are also most likely to also hate what they are doing.

The bottom-line is salespeople are typically the highest paid people in any organization. This goes in all industries and geographic areas. What you are taxed with now is deciding if you want a job “in sales” or one of the most lucrative positions in any industry.

Everybody Sells

I have worked for some inspirational and influential people in my sales career. I have retained the knowledge they have passed onto me and apply it on a daily basis. One of the best tidbits that were passed on to me is –EVERYBODY SELLS. Everyone in your organization should understand that your team as a whole is responsible for driving revenue.

The boss and mentor that drove this point home to me gave me this concept in the form of a story. While vacationing on the west coast in the 80’s my boss had met a retired bank executive. What made this retired executive unique is he was barley in his 40s.

When being drilled for information on how he had amassed a fortune large enough to retire at such a young age he responded: “I make sure everybody sells.” Now this is not a foreign concept when applying it to your sales team; this guy applied it to his entire staff.

Every employee in all of his banks was selling. The tellers would ask you if you had seen their latest Money Market rates. Even the security guard by the door would direct your eye towards the rack of brochures by the door. The security guard would do this while asking if you were interested in a mortgage or a new car loan.

This is a relatively simple concept, and my old boss and mentor did successfully apply it to our company. He is now retired, go figure. If everyone in the company shares in the revenue, everyone on should contribute to the generation of revenue. This is even more important for your client facing employees.

Are your customer services and tech support people trained to identify upgrade opportunities? Do your developers spend their time fixing bugs or creating new features they feel will drive revenue? How much does your receptionist know about your product line and offerings? She is the first person every visitor to your company sees.

The formula is simple. More people in your organization selling equals more revenue being generated.